Practical guidance

What the Land Registry shows you

What the Land Registry shows you

The Land Registry holds details of most properties by means of a plan showing the general location and boundaries of the property, and entries in the Land Register. The entries consist of a a: property register with a written description of the property;  a proprietorship register showing who owns it and has power to deal with it; and a charges register showing burdens on the property.

  • The proprietorship register will show who the registered proprietor of the property is. The registered proprietor is effectively the owner of the property, who has a power to deal with it.
  • Some charity land will have the Official Custodian for Charities as the registered owner,  in which case it is the charity trustees of the organisation that will have the right to deal with the property.
  • The proprietorship register also includes “restrictions”, which can indicate if the consent of any third party is required to register a new proprietor or sometimes other interests over the property.
  • Restrictions may also show that the property is owned by a charity that is subject to the provisions of sections 117 to 121 of the Charities Act 2011, which require a valuation procedure before sale or a Charity Commission order.
  • The Land Register will often show the name of the charity where it is an unincorporated charity after the names of the individuals who are the charity trustees.
  • The property register will show whether the property is freehold or leasehold, and in the case of leases will provide brief details including the term.
  • The charges register shows mortgages, easements affecting the property, restrictive covenants and leases affecting the property.